What a Guitar Store Taught Me About Hard Work

I have always prided myself in having a strong work ethic, and I credit this to very hard-working parents.  When I was 5, my dad quit his day job to follow his passion in music, and my parents opened a modest music store in small-town Illinois.  In the front of the store, they sold musical instruments from guitars to drums.  You name it!  Near the back of the store was a small shop for my dad to meet with customers and fix their broken guitars.  This is where he shined, and this is what made their business different from the average music store.

There was also a room intended solely for my brother and I to hang out, watch movies, play games, or do school work.  We never spent a day in daycare. Instead, we watched our parents work, did chores around the store, and played with neighborhood kids.  Or course, when we were old enough, Guitar Medic was both of our first job.

I credit my success to this upbringing.

That and a little luck.  I stumbled into a lucrative industry, was good at selling, and worked hard.  A perfect recipe for success. I’m now applying the same confidence, determination and work-ethic to my start-up, or….am I?

Earlier this week I was sitting in an airport reflecting on how little time I spent on the business this week. Feeling sorry for myself I started to take inventory of all the reasons I’ve fallen behind. Let me count the ways:

  1. Work – gotta pay the bills
  2. Travel – travel for work and gotta pay the bills
  3. Moving – I can’t work when I have a house to furnish
  4. Working out – Health has to be a priority
  5. Laying out by the pool – A basic tan is essential in Arizona
  6. Summer reading list – I need something to read while working on my tan
  7. Spending quality time with my husband – can’t neglect your support system!
  8. Big Brother – it’s a summer tradition
  9. Candy Crush … errr
  10. Daydreaming

That’s when  I realized I was passively pursuing my dream.

I am hanging back.  I am allowing fear and doubt into my day, consequently stunting productivity and progress.   When I do make some huge strides, I get scared, and suddenly “get too busy” to put in the effort.

Realizing this about myself  has propelled me forward with renewed determination.  Here I am, the girl who watched her parents take a leap of faith and open up their own business. They did this with 2 kids and no supplemental income.  What’s more, they were successful, and in the process, taught my brother a valuable lesson in passion, family and work ethic.

What is fear holding you back from? 

Are you pursuing your passion passively?  You don’t have to be starting a business to have fear hold you back your calling.  Join me this week in perseverance!  My motto: Have Faith.  Not Fear.

One thought on “What a Guitar Store Taught Me About Hard Work

  1. This is so true! I love the Gloria Steinem quote “well, when you attempt something new, there’s always fear. A couple of helpful slogans to me have been ‘follow the fear’ or ‘fear is a sign of growth’”. So keep at it! Follow that fear!

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